What’s Your Makeshift Mask?

Scenario: You’re at a grocery store 30 minutes from home when you realize you forgot your mask. What’s the plan? What do you use for a mask? As has been the case since COVID-19 Day Zero, we limited unnecessary contact by conducting Do Tell via Facebook. This shifts slightly the population we hear from on this page, from literal man-on-the-street to user-on-the-’book who elects to comment. Let’s find out what eager beaver commenters had to say on the topic of makeshift masks.


KARA FOX, Kings Beach
Writer/adjunct professor (and former Moonshine editor!)

Clean (unused) diapers that are in the car. *laughing face emoji*

SKY EMERSON, Truckee
Owner, Lake Tahoe Photo Gallery/manager, The Office BOSS

With my shirt pulled up over my face, approach the entrance and see if any employees are at the door. Then ask politely if they have a mask available. Many businesses have masks available if you ask.

DANI JOHNSTON, Tahoe City
Wife/mom of two/chief domestic officer, Johnston family

No joke. There was a customer in the Tahoe City Safeway on Saturday night around 9 p.m. wearing a mask fashioned out of four squares of toilet paper with two holes cut out for his ears. I should have taken a photo. It was pretty unbelievable.

ABBY GROMAN, Tahoma
Human resources generalist at Mountain Hardware and Sports

A true story from True Value Tahoe City, spring 2020: A female customer walked up wearing shirt, skirt, shoes, and leggings but no mask. Employee at the front asked her to put on her mask before entering the store. So she promptly removed her leggings/yoga pants and tied them around her face to cover it. Gotta give it to her, she’s crafty!

SERENITY PADUCK, Tahoma
Housekeeper/office assistant/mother

Today, I literally just watched a couple hold the newspapers from the front of the store to their face the entire time they shopped. I kept my distance but I see the effort.

 

Post-Car Living

We’re all very well aware that the pandemic’s not over. But what have we learned so far, when every trip outside one’s bubble is a potential health hazard? As pollution and noise from transit slowed down, at one point to almost a grinding halt barring necessary travel? Like climate change, with COVID-19, the enemy to fear is ourselves.

During this time, an essentials journey that’s isolated and on your own two feet is a way to distance while getting some exercise and me time. Being a pedestrian is one personal way we can reduce carbon emissions, and these Tahoe/Truckee homes are on the market today within easy walking distance of town centers for essentials and socially distanced soirées.


Photo courtesy Century-21 Tahoe North

Thin Slice of Heaven

Kings Beach has never been more accessible or affordable in this skinny little cabin, complete with an enclosed backyard that includes a deck and spa, a large kitchen, classic hardwood floors, and a wood stove. Plus, don’t you want to live on a street called Golden? Sounds ideal. Add that it’s walking distance to the lake and commercial establishments, and that the price was reduced by $10k in June, and you’re golden. Sold.

Info: $439,900, 2 bed, 1 bath, 970 square feet, 8653 Golden Ave., Kings Beach, Century-21 Tahoe North

Photo courtesy Coldwell Banker Select

As Easy as 1-2-3

Situated conveniently between Big Blue and Tahoe Drive businesses, this beautiful and spacious home makes things simple. No wonder its address is 1, 2, 3! Fancy a morning dip in the Jewel of the Sierra followed by a steaming cup of coffee in close proximity? This three-bedroom delight is your gal.

Info: $698,000, 3 bed, 2 bath, 1,253 square feet, 123 Juanita Dr. #57, Incline Village, Coldwell Banker Select

Photo courtesy Tahoe Mountain Realty

Historically There

DPR is where it’s at in Truckee: You’ve got all your modern grocery and other conveniences on the upper end past the freeway underpass, and all your small family-owned mom and pops on the stretch within historic downtown. For a large family or group, this Queen Anne Victorian has five bedrooms and a giant, landscaped backyard. Yes, it’s expensive, but this bad boy is zoned for commercial purposes as well as residential, so you’re welcome to run your very own cafe/bookstore (okay, maybe that’s this author’s dream; find your own!) out of the large, unfinished basement.

Info: $1,775,000, 5 bed, 2 bath, 1,957 square feet, 10230 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee, Tahoe Mountain Realty

Are Your ‘Two Cents’ Really Yours?

With a touchy internet culture of instant judgment, pressing “enter” on that long thought-out comment can be both the most exhilarating and the most terrifying thing in the world. Let’s take a step back, breathe, and remember that our social forums are best used for productive conversation, not virtue signaling and one-up-ism.

The Moonshine Ink Editorial Board has gotten more active in recent months, weaving together our histories, experiences, and views to form comprehensive arguments on topics all four of us feel strongly about. (Examples: Seeing is Believing and Why Do We Have CoronAmnesia?)

We have in turn entered ourselves deeper into the fray of chaotic virtue signaling and fact-slinging that social media has to offer. Dictionary.com defines virtue signaling as “the action or practice of publicly expressing opinions or sentiments intended to demonstrate one’s good character or the moral correctness of one’s position on a particular issue.”

Isn’t that an apt description of the entirety of the social media-verse?

I would argue that “keyboard warriors” who are reading or listening with the sole purpose of labeling something as wrong or problematic or politically incorrect are shooting themselves in the foot. If we can all agree on all sides of the aisle or around the dinner table that everyone should be free to express our opinions as long as they’re not hateful, then we can get past what you’re “allowed” to say and find out what people really think.

Our editorial board piece regarding Truckee police chief Leftwich’s retiring (Firestorms Don’t Heal Societal Divides) was controversial, and we are proud to say we angered people who identify across the political spectrum! Our basic point was that shutting down discourse with an individual, a community leader like a police chief, who is open to growth is the exact opposite of the goal. That we need to look inward to grapple with white supremacy in addition to holding our leaders to account, rather than feeling a sense of superiority at having identified Leftwich as a problem and eliminating his voice. The work’s not done when you figure out what’s a problem: That’s called the beginning.

We took a lot of heat on social media, with few positive public comments, yet the piece inspired a fairly large number of “heart” emoji reactions on Facebook. I actually agree with some of the backlash we received, and regardless, I am over the moon that people are engaging. The discourse, the sitting in discomfort and tough conversations: That’s what we wanted. In fact, it was exactly what we called for in the piece itself.

And yet, the most frustrating thing in the world is crafting a cogent argument and then having someone argue against points that are exaggerated or nonexistent and using those inflated and skewed summaries to admonish what you never said.

It’s important to really listen, or read, rather than just engaging with the purpose of injecting your preformed opinion at the end.

Interestingly, in contrast to social media comments, numerous in-person remarks and private emails expressed a positive reaction, saying, “I think you guys got it right.”

How can we create spaces online where people feel like they can say what they mean?

Tahoe is a place where we should feel connected, not at odds. This region is as rich in diverse perspectives as it is in variety of flora and fauna. We are retirees, we are transient millennials, we are professionals, we are families and mountain kids, we are dog owners and hikers and bikers, and we are all more similar than we are different.

Are Your ‘Two Cents’ Really Yours?

With a touchy internet culture of instant judgment, pressing “enter” on that long thought-out comment can be both the most exhilarating and the most terrifying thing in the world. Let’s take a step back, breathe, and remember that our social forums are best used for productive conversation, not virtue signaling and one-up-ism.

The Moonshine Ink Editorial Board has gotten more active in recent months, weaving together our histories, experiences, and views to form comprehensive arguments on topics all four of us feel strongly about. (Examples: Seeing is Believing and Why Do We Have CoronAmnesia?)

We have in turn entered ourselves deeper into the fray of chaotic virtue signaling and fact-slinging that social media has to offer. Dictionary.com defines virtue signaling as “the action or practice of publicly expressing opinions or sentiments intended to demonstrate one’s good character or the moral correctness of one’s position on a particular issue.”

Isn’t that an apt description of the entirety of the social media-verse?

I would argue that “keyboard warriors” who are reading or listening with the sole purpose of labeling something as wrong or problematic or politically incorrect are shooting themselves in the foot. If we can all agree on all sides of the aisle or around the dinner table that everyone should be free to express our opinions as long as they’re not hateful, then we can get past what you’re “allowed” to say and find out what people really think.

Our editorial board piece regarding Truckee police chief Leftwich’s retiring (Firestorms Don’t Heal Societal Divides) was controversial, and we are proud to say we angered people who identify across the political spectrum! Our basic point was that shutting down discourse with an individual, a community leader like a police chief, who is open to growth is the exact opposite of the goal. That we need to look inward to grapple with white supremacy in addition to holding our leaders to account, rather than feeling a sense of superiority at having identified Leftwich as a problem and eliminating his voice. The work’s not done when you figure out what’s a problem: That’s called the beginning.

We took a lot of heat on social media, with few positive public comments, yet the piece inspired a fairly large number of “heart” emoji reactions on Facebook. I actually agree with some of the backlash we received, and regardless, I am over the moon that people are engaging. The discourse, the sitting in discomfort and tough conversations: That’s what we wanted. In fact, it was exactly what we called for in the piece itself.

And yet, the most frustrating thing in the world is crafting a cogent argument and then having someone argue against points that are exaggerated or nonexistent and using those inflated and skewed summaries to admonish what you never said.

It’s important to really listen, or read, rather than just engaging with the purpose of injecting your preformed opinion at the end.

Interestingly, in contrast to social media comments, numerous in-person remarks and private emails expressed a positive reaction, saying, “I think you guys got it right.”

How can we create spaces online where people feel like they can say what they mean?

Tahoe is a place where we should feel connected, not at odds. This region is as rich in diverse perspectives as it is in variety of flora and fauna. We are retirees, we are transient millennials, we are professionals, we are families and mountain kids, we are dog owners and hikers and bikers, and we are all more similar than we are different.