New transportation plan approved for Lake Tahoe

A new transportation plan designed to moved people around the basin with them relying on their own vehicles, was approved Wednesday.
Provided

 

STATELINE, Nev. — A new transportation plan designed to get people out of their cars and ease traffic congestion was approved Wednesday for the Lake Tahoe Basin.

The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Governing Board unanimously approved the plan that it designed over several years to more effectively move people around the basin without them relying solely on their own cars.

“Today is a big day,” said TRPA Executive Director Joanne Marchetta Wednesday during the online meeting. “I think we took some very good actions for the future of Tahoe.

“This plan integrates the climate initiatives of California, Nevada, and local governments and will better serve residents and visitors by delivering improved transportation options and reduced congestion,” Marchetta said in the lead up to the meeting.

The board multiple times reconvened as different committees, including the Tahoe Metropolitan Planning Organization and Regional Planning Transportation Agency, and passed a myriad of resolutions to encompass the changes needed to put the plan in action.

The basin-wide plan identifies a broad range of policies, programs, and projects the agency says it needs to comprehensively improve Tahoe’s transportation system over the next 25 years.

The agency said in a report that over the last five years, the update was developed with support from two states, local governments and transportation partners.

In the plan, the current transit system will be modernized, the Tahoe Trail to encircle the lake will be completed and new technology for travel will be supported, according to the agency.

In total, 8,517 people helped inform the development of the plan, including 2,173 through direct engagement at meetings and 6,344 through surveys.

Six hundred twenty four Spanish speaking residents engaged through both outreach methods and over 2,000 people went through online platforms following the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020.

The full plan may be viewed at http://www.trpa.gov/rtp.

Also approved were a private driveway for an historic South Tahoe property and a pair of pier projects on the North Shore.

All three items appeared on the board’s consent agenda and were not discussed.

A new driveway was approved for Twin Pines, an amenity home at 853 Stateline Avenue in South Lake Tahoe that is used by owners of properties at Clear Creek Tahoe, a private community and club just outside the basin off U.S. Highway 50 near Carson City.

The home, designed in the 1930s by California architect Julia Morgan who also worked on the Hearst Castle, is classified as a recreation day use area.

Clear Creek is planning to build a paved 20-feet wide private driveway, 10 feet of asphalt and 5 feet of pavers on each side that would connect to Stateline Avenue. The pavers will be capable of supporting plant growth and infiltrating stormwater.

A portion of the driveway will be constructed within an easement on Edgewood Tahoe’s property.

Two pier expansion projects were also approved, one in Crystal Bay and the other in Kings Beach.

An existing pier off Gonowabie Road in Crystal Bay, Washoe County, will be relocated and expanded.

The existing pier is 12 feet wide at the pierhead and 48 feet long. The new pier will be just over 85 feet, including a 15-feet wide pierhead with a 3-foot wide boat ramp.

The new pier will service side-by-side properties owned by Gonowabie Properties LLC, which is owned by Dave Duffield.

An existing single-parcel pier that serves Lakepoint Beach Resort was redesignated as a multiple-parcel pier. The new designation will allow it to be expanded to more than 203 feet that includes a 3-foot by 30-foot catwalk at the pierhead and will retain the boat lift. The pier will serve a multi-family property at 7650 North Lake Boulevard.