California State Route 89 closed north of Emerald Bay due to bomb scare

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — California State Route 89 is closed just north of Emerald Bay.

The Tahoe Douglas Explosion Squad arrived on scene at 4:20 p.m. just north of Vikingsholm.

A second bomb squad truck arrived at 5 p.m.

Eight to 10 law enforcement vehicles sped through town heading south on Lake Tahoe Boulevard toward the scene.

No vehicles are being allowed to leave the area or pass through at this time.

This post will be updated.

Tony Romo expands lead, takes command at ACC

STATELINE, NEV. — Tony Romo gave the field a glimmer of hope, but the defending champ finished strong and holds a commanding lead heading into the final round of the American Century Championship celebrity golf tournament.

Romo double bogeyed the 14th hole and saw his lead shrink to four points, but he rallied for back-to-back birdies on 15 and 16 and finished the day with 51 points, nine points better than Mardy Fish and Derek Lowe.

“Overall, it was a good day,” Romo said. “I felt good about my game coming in. It’s nice when you’re not tinkering, just trying to execute shots.”

Romo credits playing in other competitive tournaments to improving his game and identifying his weaknesses.

“There were a lot of them,” he said. 

He didn’t have many weaknesses Saturday afternoon in front of thousands of spectators at Edgewood Tahoe.

He made six birdies, two bogeys and lost points on one hole with a double bogey using the modified stableford scoring system.

Fish tied Romo for the most points scored in the second round. He made five birdies and three bogeys and didn’t lose a single point the entire round.

Fish said he played well, but is going to sleep Saturday night thinking about the points he left out there. He referred to 16 and 18 where he had birdie opportunities.

”I left a lot out there,” Fish said. “A couple of things went in early, still missed some. I hit it closer to the pin today than yesterday, that was the big difference for me.”

Lowe started the day in second place and finished there, albeit a few points farther behind.

Lowe scored 19 points, recording two birdies and three bogeys. He started and finished with bogeys.

“It started rough and finished rough,” Lowe said and added that it was enjoyable playing with Romo for the first time. “I’m looking forward to tomorrow. Being around him, we don’t have to ask where we live and that kind of stuff. I’m looking forward to it.”

He knows the battle is uphill trying to catch Romo.

“I’m going to need to shoot in the mid 60s and get some help,” Lowe said. 

Fish agrees that catching Romo is going to take a Herculean effort, and is also sad the tournament is coming to an end.

“I’m gonna need, you would think, something in the 30s and some help,” Fish said. “There’s a lot to play for. It’s fun. The most disappointing thing is we have only one round left.”

Jack Wagner is on fourth with 38 points, three-time champ Mark Mulder has 37 and John Smotlz and Kyle Williams, who scored 24 points Saturday, have 36 points, Case Keenum has 35 and Jeremy Roenick has 34.

Dell Curry, after chipping into the water on 18, made a 50-footer for par to stay three points ahead of his son, Stephen.

The younger Curry eagled No. 18 for the second straight day and has scored 15 points in each of the first two rounds.

The two have a running bet. Two years ago, Dell jumped into Lake Tahoe after losing the scoring bet to his son.

Stephen leaped into the lake last year after his dad won the bet. 

The bet this year has changed.

“We decided to go against jumping into the lake,” Dell Curry said. “I think we are going to try to embarrass somebody with karaoke next year, so we will stick with that.”

As for Romo playing it safe Sunday, that’s not in his thought process.

“I try to take the same approach regardless,” Romo said. “You look up on the 13th hole and see where you’re at. Until then, you’re just going to try and make as many birdies as you can.”

Hundreds celebrate opening of East Shore Trail at Lake Tahoe

INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. — Gov. George Sisolak helped chop a red ribbon with giant, really dull, scissors and then started walking on Tahoe’s newest gem, a trail that will eventually reach around the lake.

Hundreds witnessed the christening of the East Shore Trail Friday afternoon, an approximately 3-mile long path between Incline Village and Sand Harbor State Park open to non-motorized bicycles and foot traffic, and then they broke it in with bikes or their feet.

The 10-foot wide paved path, that features six bridges with the longest at 810 feet, rises about 150 feet in elevation using a family-friendly grade to provide glorious views of Big Blue.

The trail drops back down and goes under Nevada State Route 28 and follows the lakeshore the remainder of the way to Sand Harbor.

“This pathway is much more than three miles,” Sisolak said. “It is a true success story of all those who came together with a shared vision to create a safer, more accessible and brighter future for ourselves, our communities and our environment. I know that this path will provide an opportunity for our hard-working Nevada families to enjoy beautiful Lake Tahoe for decades to come.”

The path is another step in a future multi-use trail circling Lake Tahoe to connect communities, parks, beaches, businesses and other destinations.

“We’re approaching the halfway mark around the lake,” Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Executive Director Joanne Marchetta told the crowd. “It’s 70 miles and we’re at 33 now.”

The trail will improve safety by taking pedestrians off a busy road that has more than two and a half million cars on it annually.

There are up to 2,000 pedestrian and bicyclists who park and recreate near the roadside on peak days.

Nearly 107 crashes occurred in the area between 2006 and 2013; accounting for approximately 25 percent of crashes on State Route 28, according to a press release. 

More than 10 miles of centerline rumble strips and emergency roadside turnouts were also added. 

The construction of the trail, which is dog-friendly using a leash, was a large undertaking and some people in the audience were trying to imagine how much life they lost while waiting in traffic.

Going under the road was no easy task. 

The 14-foot wide by 10-foot high underpass was constructed to bring the path from the east-to-west side of the road at Hidden Beach. Seventeen concrete boxes, each weighing approximately 25,000 pounds, were used to create the tunnel.

Also installed were 10 new highway turn-outs for emergency use, scenic vista pull outs; 5,000 linear feet of storm drain pipes, including 80 drainage inlets and 26,000 linear feet of curb and gutter; 4,000 linear feet of reinforcing walls; Approximately six miles of conduit to support future information technology that will provide advance driver information and other communications systems and 17 vista points and 23 interpretive panels were constructed along the pathway in partnership with the Tahoe Fund to enhance the visitor experience.

The Tahoe Transportation District served as the lead agency through environmental review of the project, and the Nevada Department of Transportation oversaw construction. Thirteen organizations came together to partner in support of the project, including the Federal Highway Administration, Nevada Division of State Lands, Nevada Division of State Parks, U.S. Forest Service-Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, Incline Village General Improvement District, Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Nevada Department of Public Safety-Highway Patrol, Washoe County, Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, as well as Carson City and Douglas County. The unique partnership effort recently received an American Trails Award for partnership.

“We are focused on working with our local partners to provide a transportation system that is safe, connected, and meets the needs of all users,” NDOT Director Kristina Swallow explained. “This project achieves all of those goals, in part, by ensuring visitors have a safe place to park and access our beautiful lake, limiting dangerous roadside parking and crossings.”

Also created were three new parking lots with about 90 spaces near Ponderosa Road right off of State Route 28 that will have direct access to the path.

The parking spots will initially be offered free of charge before transitioning in coming months to paid parking through the Tahoe Transportation District. 

Revenues will be used to operate and maintain the trail and parking.

Tahoe Transportation District’s East Shore Express and Tahoe Truckee Area Regional Transit (TART) offer bus service directly to the new pathway trailhead through Labor Day.  

The Tahoe Transportation District served as the lead agency through environmental review of the project, and the Nevada Department of Transportation oversaw construction. 

Thirteen organizations came together to partner in support of the project, including the Federal Highway Administration, Nevada Division of State Lands, Nevada Division of State Parks, U.S. Forest Service-Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, Incline Village General Improvement District, Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Nevada Department of Public Safety-Highway Patrol, Washoe County, Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, as well as Carson City and Douglas County. 

The unique partnership effort recently received an American Trails Award for partnership.

Hundreds celebrate opening of East Shore Trail at Lake Tahoe

INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. — Gov. George Sisolak helped chop a red ribbon with giant, really dull, scissors and then started walking on Tahoe’s newest gem, a trail that will eventually reach around the lake.

Hundreds witnessed the christening of the East Shore Trail Friday afternoon, an approximately 3-mile long path between Incline Village and Sand Harbor State Park open to non-motorized bicycles and foot traffic, and then they broke it in with bikes or their feet.

The 10-foot wide paved path, that features six bridges with the longest at 810 feet, rises about 150 feet in elevation using a family-friendly grade to provide glorious views of Big Blue.

The trail drops back down and goes under Nevada State Route 28 and follows the lakeshore the remainder of the way to Sand Harbor.

“This pathway is much more than three miles,” Sisolak said. “It is a true success story of all those who came together with a shared vision to create a safer, more accessible and brighter future for ourselves, our communities and our environment. I know that this path will provide an opportunity for our hard-working Nevada families to enjoy beautiful Lake Tahoe for decades to come.”

The path is another step in a future multi-use trail circling Lake Tahoe to connect communities, parks, beaches, businesses and other destinations.

“We’re approaching the halfway mark around the lake,” Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Executive Director Joanne Marchetta told the crowd. “It’s 70 miles and we’re at 33 now.”

The trail will improve safety by taking pedestrians off a busy road that has more than two and a half million cars on it annually.

There are up to 2,000 pedestrian and bicyclists who park and recreate near the roadside on peak days.

Nearly 107 crashes occurred in the area between 2006 and 2013; accounting for approximately 25 percent of crashes on State Route 28, according to a press release. 

More than 10 miles of centerline rumble strips and emergency roadside turnouts were also added. 

The construction of the trail, which is dog-friendly using a leash, was a large undertaking and some people in the audience were trying to imagine how much life they lost while waiting in traffic.

Going under the road was no easy task. 

The 14-foot wide by 10-foot high underpass was constructed to bring the path from the east-to-west side of the road at Hidden Beach. Seventeen concrete boxes, each weighing approximately 25,000 pounds, were used to create the tunnel.

Also installed were 10 new highway turn-outs for emergency use, scenic vista pull outs; 5,000 linear feet of storm drain pipes, including 80 drainage inlets and 26,000 linear feet of curb and gutter; 4,000 linear feet of reinforcing walls; Approximately six miles of conduit to support future information technology that will provide advance driver information and other communications systems and 17 vista points and 23 interpretive panels were constructed along the pathway in partnership with the Tahoe Fund to enhance the visitor experience.

The Tahoe Transportation District served as the lead agency through environmental review of the project, and the Nevada Department of Transportation oversaw construction. Thirteen organizations came together to partner in support of the project, including the Federal Highway Administration, Nevada Division of State Lands, Nevada Division of State Parks, U.S. Forest Service-Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, Incline Village General Improvement District, Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Nevada Department of Public Safety-Highway Patrol, Washoe County, Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, as well as Carson City and Douglas County. The unique partnership effort recently received an American Trails Award for partnership.

“We are focused on working with our local partners to provide a transportation system that is safe, connected, and meets the needs of all users,” NDOT Director Kristina Swallow explained. “This project achieves all of those goals, in part, by ensuring visitors have a safe place to park and access our beautiful lake, limiting dangerous roadside parking and crossings.”

Also created were three new parking lots with about 90 spaces near Ponderosa Road right off of State Route 28 that will have direct access to the path.

The parking spots will initially be offered free of charge before transitioning in coming months to paid parking through the Tahoe Transportation District. 

Revenues will be used to operate and maintain the trail and parking.

Tahoe Transportation District’s East Shore Express and Tahoe Truckee Area Regional Transit (TART) offer bus service directly to the new pathway trailhead through Labor Day.  

The Tahoe Transportation District served as the lead agency through environmental review of the project, and the Nevada Department of Transportation oversaw construction. 

Thirteen organizations came together to partner in support of the project, including the Federal Highway Administration, Nevada Division of State Lands, Nevada Division of State Parks, U.S. Forest Service-Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, Incline Village General Improvement District, Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, Nevada Department of Public Safety-Highway Patrol, Washoe County, Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, as well as Carson City and Douglas County. 

The unique partnership effort recently received an American Trails Award for partnership.

SLTPD investigating bullet holes in pair of residences

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — South Lake Tahoe Police is investigating bullet holes found at neighboring residences and believe it is not a random incident.

SLTPD received a phone call from a woman who says she found a bullet hole in her window when she woke up Thursday morning, June 27, at her residence on the 3000 block of Fresno Ave., according to a press release.

The woman told officers she woke up to a loud noise around 3 a.m. and realized she had debris on her face. She didn’t think much of it and went back to sleep, according to the release.

After police investigated, they found three bullet holes in the house and a fourth that entered a neighboring residence on the 700 block of Tallac Ave.

Police also found four handgun shell casings at the scene.

Anyone with information regarding the shooting is asked to contact SLTPD at 530-542-6100 or remain anonymous by calling Lake Tahoe Secret Witness at 530-541-6900.