mountain bikers enjoying the new trails at Soldier Mountain

Mountain biking has traditionally been more “DIY” compared to its winter siblings like skiing and snowboarding. It’s up to you to carry the essentials if your bike or you break down, instead of leaning on ski patrol. And the trails are often managed by passionate volunteer groups rather than large corporations. So, it’s fitting that the LOAM Pass, the first multi-resort mtb pass we’ve seen, resembles the community-focused Indy Ski Pass rather than the corporate Ikon or Epic passes.

What is the LOAM PASS?

At its core, the LOAM Pass is designed for mountain bikers who love to travel and sample diverse trails across the country. Instead of herding people like cattle onto the trails, it aims to offer a high-quality, affordable experience. They’ve walked this fine line by providing Loam MTB Passholders only two days at each of its 40 resorts, shuttles, and bike parks. It also includes perks such as discounts on guided service, rentals, and adding a third day if needed.

Only the Beginning

The LOAM Pass is only starting its journey. This January, they kicked off the concept with thirty destinations across the country. The plan is to keep expanding, and this May, they’ve added not one or two, but ten new partners, including prominent lift-access mountains such as Angel Fire and Park City!

Epic Rides Are Even More Epic

The worst part of mountain biking is that A LOT of the most iconic trails, like Mag 7 in Moab and the South Boundary Trail in Taos, are point-to-point. This means you need to shuttle them. If you’re at home that might work but it still involves you driving back to get your car. A total waste of time. The LOAM Pass, however, includes shuttles to some of these major rides we’ve experienced or plan to visit soon, making logistics easier.

Here’s a few that are on the LOAM Pass:

Bend

C.O.D. mtb trail in Bend Oregon
Photo by Jaime Pirozzi – Local Freshies®

With over 600 miles of trails surrounding Bend and lift-access trails on Mt. Bachelor, mountain biking in Bend, Oregon is MASSIVE. The LOAM Pass includes access to both the shuttles and the bike park, allowing you to make the most of your time in Bend and get FOUR days of riding in. Dip your toes into the experience and read our article “Going Cog Wild For Bend Oregon Mountain Biking.”

Copper Harbor

When it comes to mountain biking, the Midwest might not be the first region that comes to mind. However, that’s why Copper Harbor made our list as one of the best hidden mountain biking destinations. With 50 miles of singletrack weaving through the untamed wilderness of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, it feels more like Alaska than the Great Plains. Combine the stunning views of Lake Superior, resembling an inland sea, and it’s no surprise that Copper Harbor has been awarded the prestigious IMBA Silver Level Ride Center designation.

Oakridge

One of only FIVE IMBA awarded Gold Level Ride centers in the world! This former logging town is about one thing: mountain biking. Over 390+ miles of trails to be exact. Don’t expect purpose-built lines but a wild backcountry experience containing natural features to navigate. Big mountain descents through old growth. Rolling river trails with techy sections. All accessed by the shuttle service of Via Trans Canada Excursions.

Great Deal

If you’re planning a MTB road trip, this pass at $249 is a screaming deal. With 80 days of riding on the pass and the average ticket prices at their destinations being about $44, only use the pass six times and it pays for itself already.

Stretch Your Legs In Grants Pass

Break down trail at Mountain of the Rogue
Fun section on Breakdown – Photo by Jaime Pirozzi – Local Freshies®

If you’re planning on hitting up Ashland, Bend, or Oakridge on your MTB adventure, we recommend giving your legs a stretch and make a detour to Mountain of the Rogue (MotR) and the town of Grants Pass for a cold pint. Conveniently located halfway between Seattle and the Bay Area, it’s the perfect mid-route pit stop.

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